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Obes Res. 2004 Jul;12(7):1104-7.

Pelvic floor dysfunction in morbidly obese women: pilot study.

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1
Section of Female Urology and Voiding Dysfunction, Cleveland Clinic Florida, 2950 Cleveland Clinic Blvd., Weston, FL 33331, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of obesity on pelvic floor function in women.

RESEARCH METHODS AND PROCEDURES:

This was a prospective controlled study of 20 morbidly obese female patients planning to undergo gastric bypass surgery and 20 age-matched female controls. Subjects completed symptom and impact questionnaires, including the Incontinence Impact Questionnaire (IIQ-7), Urogenital Distress Inventory (UDI), the Kobashi Prolapse Symptom Inventory and Quality-of-Life Questionnaire (PSI-QOL), and Index of Female Sexual Function. Data were analyzed with Wilcoxon or ratio chi2 tests.

RESULTS:

Mean weight was 295.7 +/- 87.9 lbs in the study group and 144.79 +/- 33.07 lbs in the control group. Mean BMI was 52.65 +/-14.49 kg/m2 in the study group and 25.11 +/- 5.27 kg/m2 in the control group. According to the IIQ-7, urinary incontinence significantly affected lifestyle in the study group. The total IIQ-7 score was also significantly affected in the study group (p = 0.03). The UDI indicated more urinary leakage with activity (p = 0.04) and more incidents of small amounts of leakage (p = 0.02) in the study group. According to the PSI-QOL, women in the study group experienced constipation more often because of difficulty in emptying the rectum (p = 0.04). The PSI-QOL score was higher in the study group (6.75 +/- 6.84) than in the control group (2.65 +/- 3.03; p = 0.04). There were no significant differences between groups regarding sexual function.

DISCUSSION:

Morbid obesity is associated with a significant negative impact on urogenital health. Sexual function did not seem to be affected in women who are morbidly obese.

PMID:
15292474
DOI:
10.1038/oby.2004.138
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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