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Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2004 Aug;61(8):807-16.

Prevalence and co-occurrence of substance use disorders and independent mood and anxiety disorders: results from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions.

Author information

1
Laboratory of Epidemiology and Biometry, Division of Intramural Clinical and Biological Research, National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892-9304, USA. bgrant@willco.niaaa.nih.gov

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Uncertainties exist about the prevalence and comorbidity of substance use disorders and independent mood and anxiety disorders.

OBJECTIVE:

To present nationally representative data on the prevalence and comorbidity of DSM-IV alcohol and drug use disorders and independent mood and anxiety disorders (including only those that are not substance induced and that are not due to a general medical condition).

DESIGN:

Face-to-face survey.

SETTING:

The United States.

PARTICIPANTS:

Household and group quarters' residents.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Prevalence and associations of substance use disorders and independent mood and anxiety disorders.

RESULTS:

The prevalences of 12-month DSM-IV independent mood and anxiety disorders in the US population were 9.21% (95% confidence interval [CI], 8.78%-9.64%) and 11.08% (95% CI, 10.43%-11.73%), respectively. The rate of substance use disorders was 9.35% (95% CI, 8.86%-9.84%). Only a few individuals with mood or anxiety disorders were classified as having only substance-induced disorders. Associations between most substance use disorders and independent mood and anxiety disorders were positive and significant (P<.05).

CONCLUSIONS:

Substance use disorders and mood and anxiety disorders that develop independently of intoxication and withdrawal are among the most prevalent psychiatric disorders in the United States. Associations between most substance use disorders and independent mood and anxiety disorders were overwhelmingly positive and significant, suggesting that treatment for a comorbid mood or anxiety disorder should not be withheld from individuals with substance use disorders.

PMID:
15289279
DOI:
10.1001/archpsyc.61.8.807
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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