Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Brain. 2004 Sep;127(Pt 9):1942-7. Epub 2004 Aug 2.

MRI prognostic factors for relapse after acute CNS inflammatory demyelination in childhood.

Author information

1
Service de Neurologie Pédiatrique, CHU, Angers, France. yann.mikaeloff@free.fr

Abstract

The prognostic factors for relapse of the initial MRI findings after a first episode of acute CNS inflammatory demyelination are unclear in children. In this study we aimed to identify initial MRI factors that are predictive of a second attack and disability after a first episode of acute CNS inflammatory demyelination in childhood. A cohort of 116 children who had a first episode of acute CNS inflammatory demyelination between 1990 and 2002 was studied using survival analysis methods. The initial MRI data were reviewed in a systematic, standardized, double-blind manner. The average follow-up was 4.9 +/- 3 years. Multivariate analysis showed that the rate of second attack was higher in patients with corpus callosum long axis perpendicular lesions (34 out of 116 patients, 30%) on the initial MRI [hazard ratio (HR) 2.89; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.65-5.06] and/or with the sole presence of well-defined lesions (46 out of 116 patients, 40%) (HR 1.71; 95% CI 1.29-2.27). Both criteria were more specific predictors (100%) of relapse, demonstrating conversion to multiple sclerosis, than the three Barkhof criteria (63%), but were less sensitive (21% compared with 52%). None of the MRI criteria was predictive of severe disability. Using initial MRI and survival analysis methods, we identified two specific predictors of relapse and conversion to multiple sclerosis after a first episode of acute CNS inflammatory demyelination in childhood. Their low sensitivity, however, shows that this prediction remains difficult.

PMID:
15289266
DOI:
10.1093/brain/awh218
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Silverchair Information Systems
    Loading ...
    Support Center