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Crit Care Med. 2004 Aug;32(8):1740-6.

Escherichia coli pneumonia enhances granulopoiesis and the mobilization of myeloid progenitor cells into the systemic circulation.

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1
Department of Physiology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, New Orleans, LA 70112, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The process by which hematopoietic tissues respond to a pulmonary infection remains poorly understood. This study investigated the potential role of lung-derived granulopoietic cytokines in facilitating this response.

DESIGN:

Laboratory investigation.

SETTING:

University laboratory.

SUBJECTS:

Male Balb/c mice.

INTERVENTIONS:

Mice were challenged with intratracheal Escherichia coli or granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). Bone marrow cells were isolated from normal mice and treated in vitro with G-CSF.

MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS:

Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid concentrations of G-CSF, macrophage inflammatory protein-2, and keratinocyte-derived chemokine were elevated 3 and 6 hrs after intratracheal E. coli. The increases in intrapulmonary G-CSF and keratinocyte-derived chemokine were associated with increases of their concentrations in the plasma. The numbers of granulocyte-macrophage colony forming units in bone marrow, spleen, and blood were increased 48 hrs after intratracheal E. coli or G-CSF. In addition, plasma G-CSF and the number of progenitor cells (lin-ckit+Sca-1(-)) in the blood were increased at 30 mins and 48 hrs, respectively, following intratracheal G-CSF. Signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 in bone marrow cells was activated following intratracheal E. coli or G-CSF in addition to activation by in vitro G-CSF stimulation.

CONCLUSIONS:

During pulmonary infection, locally produced cytokines enter the circulation and may play an important role in initiating a granulopoietic response.

PMID:
15286552
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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