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Leukemia. 2004 Sep;18(9):1482-90.

Transplantation studies in C3-deficient animals reveal a novel role of the third complement component (C3) in engraftment of bone marrow cells.

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1
Stem Cell Biology Program at the James Graham Brown Cancer Center, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40202, USA. mzrata01@louisville.edu

Abstract

Mice deficient in complement C3 (C3(-/-)) are hematologically normal under steady-state conditions, and yet displayed a significant delay in hematopoietic recovery from either irradiation or transplantation of wild-type (WT) hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPC). Transplantation of histocompatible WT Sca-1(+) cells into C3(-/-) mice resulted in a (i) decrease in day 12 CFU-S, (ii) 5-7-day delay in platelet and leukocyte recovery, and (iii) reduced number of BM CFU-GM progenitors at day 16 after transplantation. Nevertheless, HSPC from C3(-/-) mice engrafted normally into irradiated WT mice, suggesting that there was a defect in the hematopoietic environment of C3(-/-) mice. Since C3(-/-) mice cannot activate/cleave C3, the C3 fragments C3a, C3a(des-Arg), and iC3b were examined for a role in HSPC engraftment. Liquid-phase C3a and C3a(des-Arg) increased CXCR4 incorporation into membrane lipid rafts (thus potentiating HSPC responses to SDF-1 gradients), whereas iC3b was deposited onto irradiated BM cells and functioned to tether CR3(CD11b/CD18)(+)HSPC to damaged stroma. The activity of C3a(des-Arg) suggested that C3aR(+)HSPC also expressed the C5L2 (receptor for C3a and C3a(des-Arg)) and this was confirmed. In conclusion, a novel mechanism for HSC engraftment was identified, which involves complement activation and specific C3 fragments that promote conditioning for transplantation and enhance HSPC engraftment.

PMID:
15284858
DOI:
10.1038/sj.leu.2403446
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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