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Neuropharmacology. 1992 May;31(5):497-500.

Effects of ibogaine on acute signs of morphine withdrawal in rats: independence from tremor.

Author information

1
Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Albany Medical College, NY 12208.

Abstract

Because of the claim that ibogaine suppresses the symptoms of "narcotic withdrawal" in humans, the effect of ibogaine on naltrexone-precipitated withdrawal signs in morphine-dependent rats was assessed. Morphine was administered subcutaneously through implanted silicone reservoirs for 5 days. Ibogaine (20, 40 or 80 mg/kg, i.p.) or saline was administered 30 min prior to challenge with naltrexone (1 mg/kg, i.p.) and withdrawal signs were counted for the following 2 hr. Ibogaine (40 and 80 mg/kg) significantly reduced the occurrence of four signs (wet-dog shakes, grooming, teeth chattering and diarrhea) during naltrexone-precipitated withdrawal; three other signs (weight loss, burying and flinching) were unaffected. Ibogaine induces head and body tremors lasting for 2-3 hr and the tremors might have interfered with the expression of opioid withdrawal. To examine this issue, another experiment was conducted in which ibogaine (40 mg/kg) or saline was administered 4 hr prior to challenge with naltrexone. Although there was a complete absence of tremors, ibogaine still significantly reduced the occurrence of the same four signs of withdrawal.

PMID:
1528400
DOI:
10.1016/0028-3908(92)90089-8
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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