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Neuropsychopharmacology. 2005 Jan;30(1):119-28.

Repeated administration of the GABAB receptor agonist CGP44532 decreased nicotine self-administration, and acute administration decreased cue-induced reinstatement of nicotine-seeking in rats.

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1
Department of Neuropharmacology, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA.

Abstract

Acute administration of gamma-aminobutyric acid B (GABAB) receptor agonists decreased nicotine, cocaine, ethanol, and heroin self-administration. GABAB receptor agonists also decreased cue-induced cocaine craving or seeking in humans and animals, respectively. The present study investigated the effects of repeated subcutaneous administration of the GABAB receptor agonist CGP44532 on nicotine- and food-maintained responding under a fixed ratio 5 schedule of reinforcement. The second part of the study determined whether contingent presentation of previously nicotine-associated cues reinstated extinguished nicotine-seeking behavior, and whether acute subcutaneous CGP44532 administration affected cue-induced reinstatement of extinguished nicotine-seeking behavior. The results indicated that repeated administration of 0.25 mg/kg CGP44532 selectively decreased nicotine self-administration compared to food-maintained responding during the first 7 days of treatment. Repeated administration of 0.5 mg/kg/day CGP44532 nonselectively decreased both nicotine- and food-maintained responding. Contingent presentation of previously nicotine-associated cues reinstated extinguished nicotine-seeking behavior. Further, acute CGP44532 administration (0.125 and 0.25 mg/kg) decreased cue-induced reinstatement of nicotine-seeking behavior. In summary, the present results indicated that 0.25 mg/kg/day CGP44532 selectively decreased nicotine self-administration compared to food-maintained responding, and acute administration of CGP44532 (0.125 and 0.25 mg/kg) dose-dependently decreased cue-induced reinstatement of nicotine-seeking behavior.

PMID:
15266350
DOI:
10.1038/sj.npp.1300524
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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