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Am J Sports Med. 2004 Jul-Aug;32(5):1114-21. Epub 2004 May 18.

Epidemiology and natural history of acute patellar dislocation.

Author information

1
Southern California Permanente Medical Group, San Diego, USA. donald.c.fithian@kp.org

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The goals of this study were to (1) define the epidemiology of acute patellar dislocation, (2) determine the risk of subsequent patellar instability episodes (subluxation and/or redislocation) during the study period, and (3) identify risk factors for subsequent instability episodes.

STUDY DESIGN:

Prospective cohort study.

METHODS:

The authors prospectively followed 189 patients for a period of 2 to 5 years. Historical data, injury mechanisms, and physical and radiographic measurements were recorded to identify potential risk factors for poor outcomes.

RESULTS:

Risk was highest among females 10 to 17 years old. Patients presenting with a prior history of instability were more likely to be female (P < .05) and were older than first-time dislocation patients (P < .05). Fewer first-time dislocators (17%) had episodes of instability during follow-up than patients with a previous history of instability (49%) (P < .01). After adjusting for demographics, patients with a prior history had 7 times higher odds of subsequent instability episodes during follow-up than first time dislocators (adjusted odds ratio = 6.6, P < .001).

CONCLUSIONS:

Patellar dislocators who present with a history of patellofemoral instability are more likely to be female, are older, and have greater risk of subsequent patellar instability episodes than first-time patellar dislocators. Risk of recurrent patellar instability episodes in either knee is much higher in this group than in first-time dislocators.

PMID:
15262631
DOI:
10.1177/0363546503260788
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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