Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 2004 Aug;75(8):1129-34.

Population based study of late onset cerebellar ataxia in south east Wales.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, University Hospital of Wales, Cardiff, UK.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the prevalence and causation of late onset cerebellar ataxia (LOCA) in south east Wales, United Kingdom.

METHODS:

A population based study of LOCA was conducted in a defined geographical region with a total population of 742,400. Multiple sources of ascertainment were used to identify all cases prevalent on 1 January 2001. The inclusion criteria were: a predominantly progressive cerebellar ataxia with onset of symptoms at age > or = 18 years; and disease duration of > or = 1 year. Cases with known acquired ataxias, ataxic syndromes with associated prominent autonomic dysfunction and/or atypical parkinsonism suggestive of multiple system atrophy and disorders with ataxia as a minor feature were excluded.

RESULTS:

We identified 76 index cases of LOCA, of whom 63 were sporadic, idiopathic LOCA (ILOCA) and 13 were familial LOCA, of whom six had either spinocerebellar ataxia type 6, Friedreich's ataxia or dominant episodic ataxia. The mean annual incidence rate for the period 1999-2001 was 0.3/100,000 population/year. The crude prevalence rates were 8.4 per 100,000 (95% CI 7.2 to 11.6) for ILOCA and 1.8 per 100,000 (95% CI 0.8 to 2.7) for inherited LOCA. Of the 54/63 (85.7%) patients with ILOCA who were assessed, mean (SD) age at onset of symptoms was 53.8 (14.1) years (range 19 to 78) with a male:female ratio of 2.1:1. The mean disease duration was 8.7 (6.3) years (range 1 to 31). The most frequent presenting complaint was disturbance in gait (90.7%). One-third had a relatively pure cerebellar syndrome (33.3%) and two-thirds (66.7%) had additional extracerebellar neurological features. The majority (92%) were ambulant but only 9.3% were independently self-caring.

CONCLUSION:

This population based study provides insight into LOCA within a defined region and will inform decisions about the rational use of healthcare resources for patients with LOCA.

PMID:
15258214
PMCID:
PMC1739172
DOI:
10.1136/jnnp.2003.014662
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center