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Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2004 Jul 20;101(29):10679-84. Epub 2004 Jul 12.

Lack of Toll-like receptor 4 or myeloid differentiation factor 88 reduces atherosclerosis and alters plaque phenotype in mice deficient in apolipoprotein E.

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1
Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Atherosclerosis Research Center, Burns and Allen Research Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center and David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90048, USA.

Abstract

Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and the downstream adaptor molecule myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) play an essential role in the innate immune responses. Here, we demonstrate that genetic deficiency of TLR4 or MyD88 is associated with a significant reduction of aortic plaque areas in atherosclerosis-prone apolipoprotein E-deficient mice, despite persistent hypercholesterolemia, implying an important role for the innate immune system in atherogenesis. Apolipoprotein E-deficient mice that also lacked TLR4 or MyD88 demonstrated reduced aortic atherosclerosis that was associated with reductions in circulating levels of proinflammatory cytokines IL-12 or monocyte chemoattractant protein 1, plaque lipid content, numbers of macrophage, and cyclooxygenase 2 immunoreactivity in their plaques. Endothelial-leukocyte adhesion in response to minimally modified low-density lipoprotein was reduced in aortic endothelial cells derived from MyD88-deficient mice. Taken together, our results suggest an important role for TLR4 and MyD88 signaling in atherosclerosis in a hypercholesterolemic mouse model, providing a pathophysiologic link between innate immunity, inflammation, and atherogenesis.

PMID:
15249654
PMCID:
PMC489994
DOI:
10.1073/pnas.0403249101
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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