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J Biol Chem. 2004 Sep 24;279(39):40699-706. Epub 2004 Jul 6.

Disruption of cortical actin in skeletal muscle demonstrates an essential role of the cytoskeleton in glucose transporter 4 translocation in insulin-sensitive tissues.

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1
Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, Indiana 46285, USA. brozinick_joseph_t@lilly.com

Abstract

Cell culture work suggests that signaling to polymerize cortical filamentous actin (F-actin) represents a required pathway for the optimal redistribution of the insulin-responsive glucose transporter, GLUT4, to the plasma membrane. Recent in vitro study further suggests that the actin-regulatory neural Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (N-WASP) mediates the effect of insulin on the actin filament network. Here we tested whether similar cytoskeletal mechanics are essential for insulin-regulated glucose transport in isolated rat epitrochlearis skeletal muscle. Microscopic analysis revealed that cortical F-actin is markedly diminished in muscle exposed to latrunculin B. Depolymerization of cortical F-actin with latrunculin B caused a time- and concentration-dependent decline in 2-deoxyglucose transport. The loss of cortical F-actin and glucose transport was paralleled by a decline in insulin-stimulated GLUT4 translocation, as assessed by photolabeling of cell surface GLUT4 with Bio-LC-ATB-BMPA. Although latrunculin B impaired insulin-stimulated GLUT4 translocation and glucose transport, activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and Akt by insulin was not rendered ineffective. In contrast, the ability of insulin to elicit the cortical F-actin localization of N-WASP was abrogated. These data provide the first evidence that actin cytoskeletal mechanics are an essential feature of the glucose transport process in intact skeletal muscle. Furthermore, these findings support a distal actin-based role for N-WASP in insulin action in vivo.

PMID:
15247264
PMCID:
PMC2409066
DOI:
10.1074/jbc.M402697200
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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