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J Dent. 2004 Aug;32(6):489-94.

Dental erosion, gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and saliva: how are they related?

Author information

1
Department of Conservative Dentistry, Floor 25 Guy's Tower, St Thomas' Street, London Bridge, London SE1 9RT, United Kingdom. rebecca.moazzez@kcl.ac.uk

Abstract

AIMS:

The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of tooth wear, symptoms of reflux and salivary parameters in a group of patients referred for investigation of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) compared with a group of control subjects.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Tooth wear, stimulated salivary flow rate and buffering capacity and symptoms of GORD were assessed in patients attending an Oesophageal Laboratory. Patients had manometry and 24-h pH tests, which are the gold standard for the diagnosis of GORD. Tooth wear was assessed using a modification of the Smith and Knight tooth wear index. The results were compared to those obtained from a group of controls with no symptoms of GORD.

RESULTS:

Patients with symptoms of GORD and those subsequently diagnosed with GORD had higher total and palatal tooth wear (p<0.05). The buffering capacity of the stimulated saliva from the control subjects was greater than patients with symptoms of GORD (p<0.001). Patients with hoarseness had a lower salivary flow rate compared with those with no hoarseness.

CONCLUSIONS:

Tooth wear involving dentine was more prevalent in patients complaining of symptoms of GORD and those diagnosed as having GORD following 24-h pH monitoring than controls. Patients had poorer salivary buffering capacity than control subjects. Patients complaining of hoarseness had lower salivary flow rate than controls.

PMID:
15240067
DOI:
10.1016/j.jdent.2004.03.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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