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Transplantation. 2004 May 27;77(10):1513-7.

Hepatic allograft arterialization by means of the gastroduodenal bifurcation (branch patch) as a prognostic factor.

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1
Department of General, Digestive and Abdominal Organs Transplantation, Hospital Universitario 12 de Octubre, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid, Spain.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Because of the current shortage of cadaveric organs, it is important to determine preoperatively those variables that are readily available, inexpensive, and noninvasive that can predict a higher incidence of hepatic artery thrombosis (HAT).

MATERIAL AND METHODS:

From April 1986 to October 2001, 717 patients underwent 804 liver transplants. All the arterial reconstructions were performed with fine (7-0) monofilament sutures in an interrupted fashion. Two methods were used: group I, end-to-end arterial anastomosis, and group II, the gastroduodenal branch patch.

RESULTS:

After a mean follow-up of 72 (range 3-174) months, HAT was observed in 19 patients (overall incidence 2.4%). End-to-end anastomosis (group I) was performed in 39.50% (316) of cases, and HAT developed in 14 (4.4%) cases. Branch-patch anastomoses (group II) were carried out in 60.5% (488) of the patients; the presence of HAT was detected in five cases (1.03%) (P = 0.03, P < 0.05). A total of 21 variables were selected in the univariate analysis; however, after the multivariate analysis, all but two of the factors lost statistical significance, and these corresponded to the type of arterial reconstruction (gastroduodenal branch patch vs. end-to-end) and the ABO compatibility.

CONCLUSIONS:

Liver transplantation with compatible grafts using branch-patch anastomosis for the arterialization (both manipulative by the transplant team) reduces HAT-derived loss of grafts, with the consequent increase in graft availability and reduced mortality rate on the waiting list.

PMID:
15239613
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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