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Drug Metab Rev. 2004 May;36(2):279-99.

Role of human aldehyde dehydrogenases in endobiotic and xenobiotic metabolism.

Author information

1
Molecular Toxicology and Environmental Health Sciences Program, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, School of Pharmacy, Denver, Colorado 80262, USA. vasilis.vasiliou@uchsc.edu

Abstract

The human genome contains at least 17 genes that are members of the aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) superfamily. These genes encode NAD(P)(+)-dependent enzymes that oxidize a wide range of aldehydes to their corresponding carboxylic acids. Aldehydes are highly reactive molecules that are intermediates or products involved in a broad spectrum of physiologic, biologic, and pharmacologic processes. Aldehydes are generated during retinoic acid biosynthesis and the metabolism of amino acids, lipids, carbohydrates, and drugs. Mutations in several ALDH genes are the molecular basis of inborn errors of metabolism and contribute to environmentally induced diseases.

PMID:
15237855
DOI:
10.1081/DMR-120034001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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