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Nurs Res. 1992 Sep-Oct;41(5):273-9.

Increasing condom-use intentions among sexually active black adolescent women.

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1
College of Nursing, Rutgers, State University of New Jersey, Newark.

Erratum in

  • Nurs Res 1992 Nov-Dec;41(6):380.

Abstract

Whether a social cognitive theory AIDS prevention intervention would increase intentions to use condoms among 109 sexually active inner-city black female adolescents was tested. Analyses revealed that the women scored higher in intentions to use condoms, AIDS knowledge, outcome expectancies regarding condom use, and self-efficacy to use condoms after the intervention than before the intervention. Although increased self-efficacy and more favorable outcome expectancies regarding the effects of condoms on sexual enjoyment and sexual partner's support for condom use were significantly related to increased condom-use intentions, increases in general AIDS knowledge and specific prevention-related beliefs were not.

PIP:

AIDS is the leading killer of black women of childbearing age in New Jersey and New York. Educating populations about AIDS and the risk factors for contracting HIV is often touted as sufficient to bring about risk-reducing behavioral change in a population. This study explored whether a social cognitive theory for AIDS prevention intervention would increase intentions to use condoms among a sexually active population. Instead of working to increase factual knowledge about HIV and AIDS, this approach seeks to improve subjectgs' sense of self-efficacy and perception that favorable outcomes will result from condom use. Levels of these 2 measures were tested before and after the intervention among 109 inner-city black female adolescents whose mean age was 16.79 years. Respondents were queried on intentions to use condoms in the next 3 months, perceived self-efficacy to use condoms, outcome expectancies regarding condom use, and knowledge about AIDS and sexually transmitted diseases. Following the intervention, higher scores were found in intentions to use condoms, AIDS knowledge, outcome expectancies about condom use, and self-efficacy to use condoms. Increased self-efficacy and more favorable outcome expectancies about the effect of condoms on sexual enjoyment and sexual partner's support for condom use were significantly related to increased condom use intentions. Increases in general AIDS knowledge and specific prevention-related beliefs, however, were not so related. The results of this study support the notion that education and information alone are not sufficient to bring about behavioral change.

PMID:
1523108
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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