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Neurorehabil Neural Repair. 2004 Jun;18(2):106-11.

The efficacy of combined physical and mental practice in the learning of a foot-sequence task after stroke: a case report.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, Laval University, Quebec City, Canada.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate the effect of mental practice on the learning of a sequential task for the lower limb in a patient with a hemiparesis resulting from a stroke.

DESIGN:

A single-case study.

SETTING:

Research laboratory of a university-affiliated rehabilitation center.

PATIENT:

A right-handed 38-year-old man who had suffered a left hemorrhagic subcortical stroke 4 months prior.

INTERVENTION:

The patient practiced a serial response time task with the lower limb in 3 distinct training phases over a period of 5 weeks: 2 weeks of physical practice, 1 week of combined physical and mental practice, and then 2 weeks of mental practice alone.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Performance on the task measured through errors and response times. Imagery abilities measured through questionnaires.

RESULTS:

The patient's average response time improved significantly during the 1st 5 days of physical practice (26%) but then failed to show further improvement during the following week of physical practice. The combination of mental and physical practice during the 3rd week yielded additional improvement (10.3%), whereas the following 2 weeks of mental practice resulted in a marginal increase in performance (2.2%).

CONCLUSION:

The findings show that mental practice, when combined with physical practice, can improve the performance of a sequential motor skill in people who had a stroke, and suggest that mental practice could play a role in the retention of newly acquired abilities.

PMID:
15228806
DOI:
10.1177/0888439004265249
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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