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Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2004 Jul 1;29(13):1405-12.

Development of a New Zealand white rabbit model of spinal pseudarthrosis repair and evaluation of the potential role of OP-1 to overcome pseudarthrosis.

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1
Rothman Institute at Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA, USA. jonathan.grauer@yale.edu

Abstract

STUDY DESIGN:

Posterolateral lumbar fusions were performed in nicotine-exposed, New Zealand white rabbits. Animals that developed a pseudarthrosis were then regrafted with no graft, autograft, or osteogenic protein-1 (OP-1).

OBJECTIVES:

To establish a model of pseudarthrosis repair and to evaluate the ability of OP-1 to induce fusion in this model.

SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA:

OP-1 has been shown to have a 100% fusion rate in an established rabbit fusion model, even in the presence of nicotine, which is known to inhibit fusion.

METHODS:

Forty-four New Zealand white rabbits underwent posterolateral lumbar fusion with iliac crest autograft. To maximize the incidence of pseudarthroses, nicotine was administered to all rabbits. At 5 weeks, the spines were explored, and all pseudarthroses were redecorticated and grafted with no graft, autograft, or OP-1. At 10 weeks, the rabbits were killed and fusions masses were assessed with manual palpation, radiography, computed tomography, and/or histology.

RESULTS:

Nine rabbits (20%) were lost to complications. Thirty-four (94%) had pseudarthroses on exploration at 5 weeks. By manual palpation at 10 weeks, 1 of 10 (10%) pseudarthroses that received no graft fused, 5 of 12 (42%) pseudarthroses that received autograft fused, and 9 of 11 (82%) pseudarthroses that received OP-1 fused. Computed tomography and histology further characterized the fusion masses.

CONCLUSIONS:

This study establishes a model for treatment of pseudarthroses. OP-1, which has previously been shown to have 100% fusion rate in animal models, outperformed autograft and induced fusion in 82% of rabbits.

PMID:
15223930
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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