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J Gen Virol. 2004 Jul;85(Pt 7):1859-66.

Evolution of naturally occurring 5' non-translated region variants of hepatitis C virus genotype 1b in selectable replicons.

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1
Department of Medical Microbiology, Center of Infectious Diseases, Leiden University Medical Center, 2300 RC Leiden, The Netherlands. H.C.van_Leeuwen@lumc.nl

Abstract

Quasispecies shifts are essential for the development of persistent hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Naturally occurring sequence variations in the 5' non-translated region (NTR) of the virus could lead to changes in protein expression levels, reflecting selective forces on the virus. The extreme 5' end of the virus' genome, containing signals essential for replication, is followed by an internal ribosomal entry site (IRES) essential for protein translation as well as replication. The 5' NTR is highly conserved and has a complex RNA secondary structure consisting of several stem-loops. This report analyses the quasispecies distribution of the 5' NTR of an HCV genotype 1b clinical isolate and found a number of sequences differing from the consensus sequence. The consensus sequence, as well as a major variant located in stem-loop IIIa of the IRES, was investigated using self-replicating HCV RNA molecules in human hepatoma cells. The stem-loop IIIa mutation, which is predicted to disrupt the stem structure, showed slightly lower translation efficiency but was severely impaired in the colony formation of selectable HCV replicons. Interestingly, during selection of colonies supporting autonomous replication, mutations emerged that restored the base pairing in the stem-loop. Recloning of these altered IRESs confirmed that these second site revertants were more efficient in colony formation. In conclusion, naturally occurring variants in the HCV 5' NTR can lead to changes in their replication ability. Furthermore, IRES quasispecies evolution was observed in vitro under the selective pressure of the replicon system.

PMID:
15218170
DOI:
10.1099/vir.0.79924-0
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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