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FASEB J. 2004 Aug;18(11):1309-11. Epub 2004 Jun 18.

The immune modulator FTY720 targets sphingosine-kinase-dependent migration of human monocytes in response to amyloid beta-protein and its precursor.

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1
Division of General Internal Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Innsbruck University Hospital, Innsbruck, Austria.

Abstract

Accumulation of inflammatory mononuclear phagocytes in Alzheimer's senile plaques, a hallmark of the innate immune response to beta-amyloid fibrils, can initiate and propagate neurodegeneration characteristic of Alzheimer's disease. Phagocytes migrate toward amyloid beta-protein involving formyl peptide receptor like-1-dependent signaling. Using human peripheral blood monocytes in Boyden chamber micropore filter assays, we show that the amyloid beta-protein- and amyloid beta-precursor protein-induced migration was abrogated by dimethylsphingosine, a sphingosine kinase inhibitor. Amyloid beta-protein stimulated in monocytes the gene expression for sphingosine-1-phosphate receptors 2 and 5, but not 1, 3, and 4. FTY720 that acts as a sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor agonist after endogenous phosphorylation by sphingosine kinase, as well as various neuropeptides that are known to be monocyte chemoattractants, dose-dependently inhibited amyloid beta-protein-induced migration. These data demonstrate that the migratory effects of beta-amyloid in human monocytes involve spingosine-1-phosphate signaling. Whereas endogenous neuropeptides may arrest and activate monocytes at sites of high beta-amyloid concentrations, interference with the amyloid beta-protein-dependent sphingosine-1-phosphate pathway in monocytes by FTY720, a novel immunomodulatory drug, suggests that FTY720 may be efficacious in beta-amyloid-related inflammatory diseases.

PMID:
15208267
DOI:
10.1096/fj.03-1050fje
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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