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Neuroscience. 2004;126(2):313-23.

Increased oxidative stress is associated with chronic intermittent hypoxia-mediated brain cortical neuronal cell apoptosis in a mouse model of sleep apnea.

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1
Kosair Children's Hospital Research Institute, Department of Pediatrics, 215 Baxter Building I, 570 South Preston Street, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40202, USA.

Abstract

Chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH), as occurs in obstructive sleep apnea (SA), is associated with substantial cortico-hippocampal damage leading to impairments of neurocognitive, respiratory and cardiovascular functions. Previous studies in a rat model have shown that CIH increases brain cortical neuronal cell death. However, the molecular events leading to CIH-mediated neuronal cell death remain largely undefined. The oscillation of O2 concentrations during CIH remarkably mimics the processes of ischemia/re-oxygenation and could therefore increase cellular production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). We extended the CIH paradigm to a mouse model of SA to identify the molecular mechanisms underlying cortical neuronal cell death. A significant increase of ROS production in mouse brain cortex and cortical neuronal cells was detected by fluorescent oxidation assays upon exposure of mice to CIH, followed by increased expression of oxidative stress response markers, c-Fos, c-Jun and NF-kappaB in mouse brain cortex, as revealed by immunohistochemical and LacZ reporter assays respectively. Long-term exposure of mice to CIH increased the levels of protein oxidation, lipid peroxidation and nucleic acid oxidation in mouse brain cortex. Furthermore, exposure of mice to CIH induced caspase-3 activation and increased some cortical neuronal cell apoptosis. On the other hand, transgenic mice overexpressing Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase exposed to CIH conditions had a lower level of steady-state ROS production and reduced neuronal apoptosis in brain cortex compared with that of normal control mice. Taken together, these findings suggest that the increased ROS production and oxidative stress propagation contribute, at least partially, to CIH-mediated cortical neuronal apoptosis and neurocognitive dysfunction.

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