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Emerg Infect Dis. 2004 Jun;10(6):1088-94.

Antimicrobial resistance incidence and risk factors among Helicobacter pylori-infected persons, United States.

Author information

1
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia 30333, USA. wdd8@cdc.gov

Abstract

Helicobacter pylori is the primary cause of peptic ulcer disease and an etiologic agent in the development of gastric cancer. H. pylori infection is curable with regimens of multiple antimicrobial agents, and antimicrobial resistance is a leading cause of treatment failure. The Helicobacter pylori Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring Program (HARP) is a prospective, multicenter U.S. network that tracks national incidence rates of H. pylori antimicrobial resistance. Of 347 clinical H. pylori isolates collected from December 1998 through 2002, 101 (29.1%) were resistant to one antimicrobial agent, and 17 (5%) were resistant to two or more antimicrobial agents. Eighty-seven (25.1%) isolates were resistant to metronidazole, 45 (12.9%) to clarithromycin, and 3 (0.9%) to amoxicillin. On multivariate analysis, black race was the only significant risk factor (p < 0.01, hazard ratio 2.04) for infection with a resistant H. pylori strain. Formulating pretreatment screening strategies or providing alternative therapeutic regimens for high-risk populations may be important for future clinical practice.

PMID:
15207062
PMCID:
PMC3323181
DOI:
10.3201/eid1006.030744
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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