Format

Send to

Choose Destination

Assessment of depression prevalence in rural Uganda using symptom and function criteria.

Author information

1
Dept. of International Health, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston (MA), USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

We sought to assess the prevalence of major depression in a region of sub-Saharan Africa severely affected by HIV, using symptom and functional criteria as measured with locally validated instruments.

METHOD:

Six hundred homes in the Masaka and Rakai districts of southwest Uganda were selected by weighted systematic random sampling. A locally validated version of the depression section of the Hopkins Symptom Check List (DHSCL) and a community-generated index of functional impairment were used to interview 587 respondents.

RESULTS:

Of respondents, 21% were diagnosed with depression using three of the five DSM-IV criteria (including function impairment) compared with 24.4% using symptom criteria alone. Increased age and lower educational levels are associated with a greater risk for depression; however, a gender effect was not detected.

CONCLUSIONS:

Most community-based assessments of depression in sub-Saharan Africa based on the DSM-IV have used symptom criteria only. We found that expanding criteria to more closely match the complete DSM-IV is feasible, thereby making more accurate assessments of prevalence possible. This approach suggests that major depression and associated functional impairment are a substantial problem in this population.

PMID:
15205728
DOI:
10.1007/s00127-004-0763-3
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Springer
Loading ...
Support Center