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Heart. 2004 Jul;90(7):760-4.

Effects of carvedilol on left ventricular remodelling in chronic stable heart failure: a cardiovascular magnetic resonance study.

Author information

  • 1Royal Brompton Hospital, London, UK.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The ability of beta blockers to improve left ventricular function has been demonstrated, but data on the effects on cardiac remodelling are limited.

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate, using cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR), the effects of carvedilol on left ventricular remodelling in patients with chronic stable heart failure and left ventricular systolic dysfunction caused by coronary artery disease.

DESIGN:

Randomised, double blind, placebo controlled study.

SETTING:

Chronic stable heart failure.

PATIENTS AND INTERVENTION:

34 patients with chronic stable heart failure and left ventricular systolic function taking part in the CHRISTMAS trial (double blind carvedilol v placebo) underwent CMR before randomisation and after six months of treatment.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE:

Left ventricular remodelling at six months.

RESULTS:

The carvedilol and placebo groups were well balanced at baseline, with no significant intergroup differences. Over the study period, there was a significant reduction in end systolic volume index (ESV(I)) and end diastolic volume index (EDV(I)) between the carvedilol and the placebo group (carvedilol -9 v placebo +3 ml/m2, p = 0.0004; carvedilol -8 v placebo 0 ml/m2, p = 0.05). The ejection fraction increased significantly between the groups (carvedilol +3% v placebo -2%, p = 0.003).

CONCLUSIONS:

Treatment of chronic stable heart failure with carvedilol results in significant improvement in left ventricular volumes and function. These effects might contribute to the benefits of carvedilol on mortality and morbidity in patients with chronic heart failure.

PMID:
15201244
PMCID:
PMC1768304
DOI:
10.1136/hrt.2003.015552
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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