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J Dermatol Sci. 2004 Jun;35(1):43-51.

Serum levels of a Th1 chemoattractant IP-10 and Th2 chemoattractants, TARC and MDC, are elevated in patients with systemic sclerosis.

Author information

1
Department of Dermatology, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan. sinosino@eos.ocn.ne.jp

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Although abnormalities of various chemokines are detected in systemic sclerosis (SSc), there are few findings concerning Th1 or Th2 chemoattractants.

OBJECTIVE:

To determine whether serum levels of chemokines preferentially chemotactic for Th1 cells (IP-10 and MIG) and predominantly chemotactic for Th2 cells (TARC and MDC) are elevated and whether they correlate with clinical features in patients with SSc.

METHODS:

Serum samples from patients with diffuse cutaneous SSc (dSSc; n = 34), limited cutaneous SSc (lSSc; n = 30), dermatomyositis (DM; n = 15), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE; n = 22), and normal controls (n = 30) were examined by sandwich ELISA.

RESULTS:

Serum TARC levels were significantly elevated in dSSc patients (P < 0.0002) and lSSc patients (P < 0.0001) compared with normal controls. Similarly, serum MDC levels were significantly increased in patients with dSSc (P < 0.02) or lSSc (P < 0.05) relative to normal controls. In addition, serum IP-10 was detected significantly more frequently in patients with dSSc (44%), lSSc (30%), or DM (53%) than normal controls (0%) and patients with SLE (0%). Furthermore, elevated TARC levels correlated with the presence of pitting scars and anti-topoisomerase I antibody, increased titers of anti-topoisomerase I and antinuclear antibody, and decreased glomerular filtration rate. Increased MDC levels were associated with pitting scars and younger ages at onset.

CONCLUSION:

These results suggest that both Th2 chemoattractants, TARC and MDC, and a Th1 chemoattractant IP-10 play a role in the development of SSc.

PMID:
15194146
DOI:
10.1016/j.jdermsci.2004.03.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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