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Acta Paediatr. 2004 Apr;93(4):529-33.

Preterm male infants need more initial respiratory and circulatory support than female infants.

Author information

1
Department of Paediatrics, Lund University Hospital, Sweden. emma.elsmen@pedi.lu.se

Abstract

AIM:

The aim of this study was to investigate possible gender-related differences in clinical parameters during the first week of life that could explain the higher morbidity and mortality of preterm male infants.

METHODS:

In total, 130 clinical variables were collected from 236 inborn infants (130 male and 106 female infants) with gestational age (GA) < 29 wk. A subgroup of 175 extremely low birthweight infants (ELBW) < 1000 g (n = 86 males; n = 89 females) was analysed separately.

RESULTS:

At 6 postnatal h, 60.8% of the male infants needed mechanical ventilation versus 46.2% of the females (p = 0.026). Chronic lung disease (CLD) developed in 36.2% of males versus 9.8% of female infants (p = 0.004). Inotrope support with dopamine was used in more than 50% of the infants; additional inotrope support to dopamine was needed by 19.4% of male and 9.7% of female infants (p = 0.041). The gender-related difference in need for inotrope support was more evident among the ELBW infants; 67.1% of male infants needed inotrope support versus 50.6% of females (p = 0.028). At 12-24 h, male ELBW infants had lower minimum mean arterial blood pressure (mean (SD) 25(4) mmHg vs 28(6) mmHg, p = 0.004)) and lower minimum PaCO2 than females infants (4.3 (1.1) kPa vs 4.7 (0.9) kPa, p = 0.043).

CONCLUSIONS:

There are early gender-related differences in need for ventilatory and circulatory support that may contribute to the worse long-term outcome in prematurely born male infants.

PMID:
15188982
DOI:
10.1080/08035250410024998
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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