Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Pediatr Psychol. 2004 Jul-Aug;29(5):389-96.

Brief report: a "storybook" ending to children's bedtime problems--the use of a rewarding social story to reduce bedtime resistance and frequent night waking.

Author information

1
Girls and Boys Town, Nebraska, and University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE 68010, USA. burker@girlsandboystown.org

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate the efficacy and acceptability of a social story with tangible rewards to reduce children's disruptive bedtime behavior and frequent night waking.

METHOD:

Four children (ages 2 to 7), with clinically significant disruptive bedtime behavior, received the intervention, which consisted of a social story (The Sleep Fairy) that sets forth (a) parental expectations for appropriate bedtime behavior and (b) rewards for meeting those expectations.

RESULTS:

Parent sleep diaries indicated that children had a 78% average decrease in frequency of disruptive bedtime behaviors from baseline to intervention, with another 7% decrease at 3-month follow-up. Night wakings, a problem for 2 children during baseline, were not a problem during intervention and follow-up. Parents reported improved daytime behavior for 3 of the 4 children. Parents gave the intervention high acceptability ratings and maintained a high level of treatment fidelity.

CONCLUSIONS:

Use of a social story helped parents implement a multicomponent intervention using a familiar bedtime routine, thereby increasing the likelihood that implementation and effects occurred. The book format makes this intervention widely available to parents and professionals, with minimal costs and inconvenience.

PMID:
15187177
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Loading ...
Support Center