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Curr Drug Metab. 2004 Jun;5(3):211-24.

Cytochrome P450 gene polymorphism and cancer.

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1
Department of Pharmacology, Medical School, University of Extremadura, Avda. de Elvas s/n, E-06071, Badajoz, Spain. jagundez@unex.es

Abstract

Human cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes play a key role in the metabolism of drugs and environmental chemicals. Several CYP enzymes metabolically activate procarcinogens to genotoxic intermediates. Phenotyping analyses revealed an association between CYP enzyme activity and the risk to develop several forms of cancer. Research carried out in the last decade demonstrated that several CYP enzymes are polymorphic due to single nucleotide polymorphisms, gene duplications and deletions. As genotyping procedures became available for most human CYP, an impressive number of association studies on CYP polymorphisms and cancer risk were conducted. Here we review the findings obtained in these studies regarding CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP1B1, CYP2A6, CYP2B6, CYP2C8, CYP2C9, CYP2C18, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, CYP2E1, CYP3A4, CYP3A5, CYP3A7, CYP8A1 and CYP21 gene polymorphisms. Consistent evidences for association between CYP polymorphisms and lung, head and neck, and liver cancer were reported. Controversial findings suggest that colorectal and prostate cancers may be associated to CYP polymorphisms, whereas no evidences for a relevant association with breast or bladder cancers were reported. We summarize the available information related to the association of CYP polymorphisms with leukaemia, lymphomas and diverse types of cancer that were investigated only for some CYP genes, including brain, esophagus, stomach, pancreas, pituitary, cervical epithelium, melanoma, ovarian, kidney, anal and vulvar cancers. This review discusses on causes of heterogeneity in the proposed associations, controversial findings on cancer risk, and identifies topics that require further investigation. In addition, some recommendations on study design, in order to obtain more conclusive findings in further studies, are provided.

PMID:
15180491
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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