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Eur J Cardiovasc Prev Rehabil. 2004 Jun;11(3):223-7.

Impact of a correct breathing stereotype on pulmonary minute ventilation, blood gases and acid-base balance in post-myocardial infarction patients.

Author information

1
Laboratory of Cardiological Rehabilitation, Institute of Cardiology, Kaunas University of Medicine, Sukilëliø 17, Kaunas, Lithuania. donatas@kmu.lt

Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVE:

The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of a long-term (6-month) correct breathing stereotype on minute ventilation, capillary blood gases and acid-base balance in post-myocardial infarction patients.

METHODS:

Fifty-five men (age 57.2 +/- 12.5) were examined 2 months later after myocardial infarction. Spirometry and assessment of acid-base balance and capillary blood gases were performed at rest and repeated after 10 days and 6 months. Breathing correction was taught over 5 days. A session for the control and maintenance of the correct breathing skills was hosted once a month (during the 6-month period).

RESULTS:

Changes of minute ventilation, capillary blood gases and acid-base balance were revealed in 55% of patients 2 months later after myocardial infarction. Twenty patients (group I) were randomly selected for breathing correction while 10 patients made up the control group (group II). After breathing correction minute ventilation significantly decreased (18.5 +/- 5.5 versus 9.8 +/- 2.5 l/min), oxygen ventilatory equivalent decreased (39.8 +/- 5.2 versus 22.5 +/- 3.8), partial pressure of blood carbon dioxide increased (33.2 +/- 1.7 versus 44.2 +/- 2.5 mmHg), plasma bicarbonate concentration augmented (19.1 +/- 2.2 versus 24.5 +/- 1.8 mmol/l), base excess normalized (-2.90 +/- 2.5 versus +1.3 +/- 2.1 mmol/l), and pH shifted to more alkaline value (7.36 +/- 0.01 versus 7.43 +/- 0.02).

CONCLUSIONS:

A long-term correct breathing stereotype improved respiratory function and could be an additional measure in rehabilitation programmes for post-myocardial infarction patients.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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