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Ann Surg Oncol. 2004 Jun;11(6):606-11.

Hepatic resection of the intraductal papillary type of peripheral cholangiocarcinoma.

Author information

1
Department of Surgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, 5 Fu-Hsing Street, Kwei-Shan, Taoyuan, Taiwan. ycn@adm.cgmh.org.tw

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Peripheral cholangiocarcinoma (PCC) can be grossly classified into mass-forming, periductal-infiltrating, and intraductal papillary (IP) types. Information on IP-PCC patients undergoing hepatectomy is sparse because of the small number of cases.

METHODS:

The clinical features of 40 IP-PCC patients undergoing hepatectomy between 1977 and 2000 were reviewed. The clinical features of 94 PCC patients without IP growth undergoing hepatectomy were used for comparison.

RESULTS:

IP-PCC and non-IP-PCC groups had similar age distributions (P =.674), sex ratios (P =.079), and positive rates for serum carcinoembryonic antigen and CA 19-9 (P =.121 and.795, respectively). The two groups also exhibited similar rates of association between hepatolithiasis and PCC (P =.230). However, more IP-PCC patients exhibited signs during admission, and more had ALT values >36 IU/L; they also had smaller tumors, more mucobilia association, and tumors in earlier stages and had undergone more postoperative chemotherapy. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that only ALT >36 IU/L differentiated IP-PCC from non-IP-PCC patients. The two groups exhibited similar operative mortality (P = 1.0). Follow-up ranged from 1.6 to 125.2 months (mean and median, 44.6 and 5.7 months, respectively). The 1-, 3-, and 5-year overall survival rates were 72.9%, 41.2%, and 24.7%, respectively, in the IP-PCC group and 43.3, 6.03%, and 2.01% in the non-IP-PCC group. The prognosis was favorable for the IP-PCC patients (P <.00001), particularly for IP-PCC patients who received curative hepatectomy (P =.013).

CONCLUSIONS:

IP-PCC patients had significantly better survival than non-IP-PCC patients, and aggressive curative hepatic resection is associated with a longer survival.

PMID:
15172934
DOI:
10.1245/ASO.2004.04.028
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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