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Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2004 Sep 1;170(5):534-40. Epub 2004 Jun 1.

Small size at birth and greater postnatal weight gain: relationships to diminished infant lung function.

Author information

1
B.M., MRC Environmental Epidemiology Unit, Southampton General Hospital, Southampton SO16 6YD, UK.

Abstract

Recent evidence suggests that impaired lung development is linked with diminished lung function and an increased risk of chronic obstructive airway disease in adulthood. To examine environmental influences on early lung development, we measured lung function in 131 normal-term infants aged 5-14 weeks. Adjusting for age at measurement, FEV at 0.4 seconds fell by 4.4% for each standard deviation decrease in birth weight (p = 0.047); when adjusted for FVC, FEV at 0.4 seconds was not related to birth weight but fell by 3.2% per standard deviation increase in infant weight gain (p = 0.001). Age- and sex-adjusted total respiratory system compliance fell by 7.0% per standard deviation decrease in birth weight (p < 0.001) but was not related to infant weight gain. In univariate analyses, age-adjusted forced expiratory flow at functional residual capacity was not related to birth weight, but decreased by 11.0% per standard deviation increase in infant weight gain (p = 0.007). The respiratory rate rose by 5.1% per standard deviation increase in infant weight gain (p = 0.001). Lung function measurements were not related to infant feeding. The observations suggest that lower rates of fetal growth and higher rates of early infancy weight gain are associated with impaired lung development.

PMID:
15172897
DOI:
10.1164/rccm.200311-1583OC
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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