Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Herz. 2004 May;29(3):310-6.

[Impact of smoking on the results of coronary artery bypass surgery].

[Article in German]

Author information

1
Thoraxklinik am Universitätsklinikum Heidelberg, Heidelberg. amirmortasawi@yahoo.de

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE:

The proportion of patients undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG) with a history of smoking is increasing. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of smoking on outcomes following CABG.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

6,367 consecutive patients who underwent CABG between April 1997 and March 2003 were analyzed retrospectively. Logistic regression was used to risk-adjust inhospital outcomes, while Cox proportional hazards analysis was used to risk-adjust Kaplan-Meier survival curves. Outcomes were adjusted for variables suggested by the American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology.

RESULTS:

947 patients (14.9%) were current smokers (smoking within 1 month of surgery), while 3,857 (60.6%) were ex-smokers and 1,563 (24.5%) nonsmokers. After adjusting for differences in case-mix, current smokers were more likely to develop chest infections (p < 0.001), atelectasis (p < 0.001), and require ventilation > 48 h (p = 0.003). Current smokers were also more likely to stay in intensive care for > 3 days (p < 0.001). There was no association between smoking status and in-hospital mortality. Ex-smokers were not associated with excess mortality (p = 0.11), while current smokers had significantly increased mortality during follow-up (p = 0.029).

CONCLUSION:

Current smokers are associated with increased respiratory complications, and prolonged stay on intensive care. Although not associated with in-hospital mortality, there appears to be a significant increase in mortality in smokers during a 4-year follow-up period. Patients should be encouraged to stop smoking to maximize the long-term benefits of CABG.

PMID:
15167958
DOI:
10.1007/s00059-004-2573-5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Springer
    Loading ...
    Support Center