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Stroke. 2004 Jul;35(7):1531-7. Epub 2004 May 27.

Animal protein, animal fat, and cholesterol intakes and risk of cerebral infarction mortality in the adult health study.

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1
Department of Epidemiology, Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima, Japan. sauvaget@rerf.jp

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE:

A traditional diet that is poor in animal products is thought to explain the high rate of stroke in Asian populations. The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of a diet rich in animal protein, animal fat, and cholesterol on the risk of cerebral infarction mortality in a Japanese population.

METHODS:

A prospective study of 3731 Japanese men and women aged 35 to 89 years was conducted from 1984 to 2001. Nutrient intake was estimated at baseline from the responses to a 24-hour diary. During the follow-up period, cases of cerebral infarction deaths (as entered on death certificates) were monitored.

RESULTS:

During the follow-up period, 60 deaths were attributed to cerebral infarction. A high intake of animal fat and cholesterol was significantly associated with a reduced risk of cerebral infarction death. The risk was reduced by 62% (CI, 82% to 18%) for those in the third tertile of animal fat intake, compared with those in the first tertile, with a significant linear dose-response relationship (P=0.0073). The risk of death from infarction was reduced by 63% (CI, 82% to 22%) in the high cholesterol consumption group, compared with the low consumption group. A significant linear dose-response relationship was observed. Animal protein was not significantly associated with infarction mortality after adjustment for animal fat and cholesterol.

CONCLUSIONS:

This study suggests that in Japan, where animal product intake is lower than in Western countries, a high consumption of animal fat and cholesterol was associated with a reduced risk of cerebral infarction death.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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