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World J Gastroenterol. 2004 Jun 1;10(11):1589-93.

Community-based survey of HCV and HIV coinfection in injection drug abusers in Sichuan Province of China.

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1
Center for AIDS/STD Control and Prevention, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing 100050, China.

Abstract

AIM:

To investigate the prevalence and risk factors of HCV/HIV coinfection in injection drug abusers (IDAs) in Lianshan Yi Autonomous Prefecture of Sichuan province, China.

METHODS:

From November 8, 2002 to November 29, 2002, a community-based survey was conducted to investigate the demographic characteristics, patterns of shared injectors devices and sexual behaviors in IDAs. Blood samples were also collected to test HCV and HIV infection. A total of 379 subjects were recruited in the study through community outreach and peer recruiting methods.

RESULTS:

Of the 379 IDAs, the HCV prevalence and HIV prevalence were 71.0% and 11.3%, respectively, and HCV/HIV coinfection was 11.3%. HCV infection was found in 100% and 67.3% of HIV-positive and HIV-negative IDAs, respectively. HIV prevalence was 16.0% in HCV positive IDAs while none of the HCV negative IDAs was positive for HIV. Ethnicity, shared needles or syringes and cotton in the past 3 mo and syphilis infection were associated with HCV/HIV coinfection shown by univariate analysis using chi-square test. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that shared needles or syringes in the past 3 mo (Odds ratio=3.121, 95% CI: 1.278-7.617, P<0.05) and syphilis infection (Odds ratio=2.914, 95% CI: 1.327-6.398, P<0.01) were significantly associated with HCV infection. No statistically significant association was found in univariate analysis between sexual behaviors and HCV/HIV coinfection.

CONCLUSION:

Shared needles and syringes in the past 3 mo and syphilis infection were significantly associated with HCV infection. Further sero-epidemiological prospective cohort studies should be conducted to clarify the impact of syphilis and high risk sexual behaviors on HCV transmission through unprotected sexual intercourse.

PMID:
15162531
PMCID:
PMC4572760
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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