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J Am Geriatr Soc. 2004 Jun;52(6):916-21.

Lipoprotein levels are associated with incident hypertension in older adults.

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1
Department of Epidemiology, Graduate School of Public Health, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15261, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To determine the relationship between baseline measures of serum lipoproteins and incident hypertension in older adults.

DESIGN:

Prospective cohort study.

SETTING:

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, site of Systolic Hypertension in the Elderly Program (SHEP).

PARTICIPANTS:

One hundred eighty-seven men and women (mean age 71.3), normotensive (systolic blood pressure (SBP) <160 mmHg, diastolic blood pressure (DBP) <90 mmHg) at baseline, were followed annually over 8 years as an ancillary study to the SHEP.

MEASUREMENTS:

Hypertension development, defined as initiation of antihypertensive therapy or SBP greater than 160 mmHg or DBP greater than 90 mmHg. Lipoprotein measures included total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), HDL(2)-C, HDL(3)-C, triglycerides, and apolipoproteins 1, 2, and B.

RESULTS:

Over 8 years, 44 participants developed hypertension, for a Kaplan-Meier cumulative incidence rate of 31% (95% confidence interval (CI)=23-39%). Cumulative incidence rates were highly associated with baseline SBP, ranging from 8% in those with baseline SBP less than 120 mmHg to 70% in those with SBP of 140 to 159 mmHg. Other univariate associations included higher DBP, pulse pressure (P <.01 for both), triglycerides (P=.03), apolipoprotein B (P=.03), and lower HDL-C (P=.04) and HDL(3)-C (P=.02). In multivariate Cox regression analysis, higher baseline SBP (relative risk (RR)=1.8 per 10 mmHg, 95% CI=1.5-2.3) and lower HDL(3)-C (RR=0.8 per 5 mg/dL, 95% CI=0.42-1.0) remained significant independent predictors of time to hypertension.

CONCLUSION:

Older adults with abnormal serum lipoproteins are at increased risk of developing hypertension. Clinical trials exploring the effects of the modification of lipoprotein levels on hypertension incidence rates are needed.

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