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Oncogene. 2004 May 24;23(24):4225-31.

p300/CBP and cancer.

Author information

1
Cancer Genomics Program, Department of Oncology, University of Cambridge, Hutchison/MRC Research Centre, Cambridge CB2 2XZ, UK.

Abstract

p300 and cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CBP) are adenoviral E1A-binding proteins involved in multiple cellular processes, and function as transcriptional co-factors and histone acetyltransferases. Germline mutation of CBP results in Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome, which is characterized by an increased predisposition to childhood malignancies. Furthermore, somatic mutations of p300 and CBP occur in a number of malignancies. Chromosome translocations target CBP and, less commonly, p300 in acute myeloid leukemia and treatment-related hematological disorders. p300 mutations in solid tumors result in truncated p300 protein products or amino-acid substitutions in critical protein domains, and these are often associated with inactivation of the second allele. A mouse model confirms that p300 and CBP function as suppressors of hematological tumor formation. The involvement of these proteins in critical tumorigenic pathways (including TGF-beta, p53 and Rb) provides a mechanistic route as to how their inactivation could result in cancer.

PMID:
15156177
DOI:
10.1038/sj.onc.1207118
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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