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J Aging Health. 2004 Jun;16(3):315-37.

Racial differences in perceived discrimination in a community population of older blacks and whites.

Author information

1
Rush Alzheimer's Disease Center and Institute for Healthy Aging. Lisa_L_Barnes@rush.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To examine the prevalence of perceived discrimination in an older biracial population and to examine its correlation with depressive symptoms.

METHODS:

The sample consisted of 2,652 Blacks and 1,630 Whites, 68 years old and older, from the Chicago Health and Aging Project (CHAP). Perceived discrimination was measured with a nine-item scale developed by Williams, Yu, Jackson, and Anderson (1997).

RESULTS:

A factor analysis of the discrimination scale revealed two subscales, unfair treatment and personal rejection. Blacks scored higher on both subscales as compared with Whites. In linear regression models, race was significantly associated with higher levels of unfair treatment and personal rejection, controlling for demographic variables and socioeconomic status (SES). Each subscale was also positively related to depressive symptoms, and these effects did not vary by race.

DISCUSSION:

These findings suggest that older Blacks perceive more discrimination than do older Whites. This may have important implications for health differences between older Blacks and Whites.

PMID:
15155065
DOI:
10.1177/0898264304264202
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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