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Int J Psychiatry Med. 2003;33(4):357-75.

Religion, race, and breast cancer survival.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520-8034, USA. peter.vanness@yale.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The study investigated whether any of four measures of religiousness predicted longer survival for 145 African-American and 177 White women diagnosed with breast cancer in Connecticut between January 1987 and March 1989.

METHOD:

Multivariate Cox proportional hazards models included a religious predictor and sociodemographic, biomedical, treatment, behavioral, and medical care covariables.

RESULTS:

The no denomination group had a hazard ratio (HR) of 4.39 (95% Confidence Interval (CI) = 1.42, 13.64). Other measures of religiousness did not yield statistically significant results but showed a consistent pattern of nonreligiousness being more strongly and negatively related to breast cancer survival in African Americans than in Whites.

CONCLUSIONS:

Exploratory models confirmed that lack of religiousness was associated in this sample with poor breast cancer survival among African American women.

PMID:
15152786
DOI:
10.2190/LRXP-6CCR-G728-MWYH
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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