Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Arthritis Rheum. 2004 May;50(5):1686-9.

Suppressive oligonucleotides protect against collagen-induced arthritis in mice.

Author information

1
CBER/FDA, US Food and Drug Administration, Building 29A, Room 3D10, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine whether systemic administration of oligonucleotides (ODNs), known to inhibit the production of proinflammatory cytokines, alters host susceptibility to collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), a murine model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA).

METHODS:

CIA was induced by injecting DBA/1 mice with type II collagen (CII) in Freund's complete adjuvant, followed 3 weeks later by CII in Freund's incomplete adjuvant. The effect of suppressive ODNs on the incidence and severity of disease was monitored, as were immune correlates of CIA.

RESULTS:

Suppressive ODNs administered during the inductive phase of CIA significantly reduced the incidence and severity of arthritis. Treatment with suppressive ODNs significantly decreased serum titers of pathogenic IgG anti-CII autoantibodies and interferon-gamma production by collagen-reactive T cells.

CONCLUSION:

Suppressive ODNs may be of therapeutic value in the treatment of RA, and potentially other autoimmune diseases.

PMID:
15146440
DOI:
10.1002/art.20263
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wiley
Loading ...
Support Center