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Int J Soc Psychiatry. 2004 Mar;50(1):54-65.

Stress, burnout, coping and stress management in psychiatrists: findings from a systematic review.

Author information

1
School of Care Sciences, University of Glamorgan, Pontypridd, Wales, UK. afotherg@glam.ac.uk

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Research into stress among psychiatrists has attempted to identify stressors, which can lead to physical illness and psychological distress.

AIMS:

The aim of the study was systematically to review the current evidence for the effectiveness of stress management interventions for those working in the psychiatric profession.

METHOD:

A systematic review of the current literature was conducted into stress and stress management within the profession of psychiatry.

RESULTS:

Twenty-three international studies were included in the psychiatry section of the review. Psychiatrists report a range of stressors in their work, including stress associated with their work and personal stresses. One personal stress, which psychiatrists find very difficult to cope with is patient suicide. Coping strategies include support from colleagues and outside interests. No studies evaluated the use of stress-management interventions for psychiatrists.

CONCLUSIONS:

Psychiatry is a stressful profession. Psychiatrists identified several stressors in their professional and personal lives.

PMID:
15143847
DOI:
10.1177/0020764004040953
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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