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Gastroenterology. 2004 May;126(5):1293-301.

The effect of alcohol consumption on the prevalence of iron overload, iron deficiency, and iron deficiency anemia.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine and Division of Gastroenterology, University of Washington Medical Center, and VA Medical Center, 1660 S. Columbian Way, Seattle, WA 98108, USA. georgei@medicine.washington.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND & AIMS:

Our aim was to investigate the relationship between alcohol consumption and iron overload, iron deficiency, or iron deficiency anemia in the U.S. population.

METHODS:

Adult participants of the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey who did not consume alcohol (n = 8839) were compared with participants who consumed < or =1 (n = 4976), >1 to < or =2 (n = 1153), or >2 (n = 915) alcoholic drinks/day during the preceding 12 months. We examined the following markers of iron overload: elevated serum transferrin-iron saturation (TS) level (>45%, >50%, and >60%), elevated serum ferritin level (>300, >400, >500, and >600 ng/mL), and combinations of both elevated serum TS and ferritin levels. Iron deficiency was defined as the presence of at least 2 of the following: serum ferritin level <12 ng/mL, serum TS level <15%, and erythrocyte protoporphyrin level >1.24 micromol/L. Iron deficiency anemia was defined as the presence of both iron deficiency and anemia.

RESULTS:

Compared with nondrinkers, the prevalence of all markers of iron overload was significantly elevated among those who consumed >2 alcoholic drinks/day after adjusting for potential confounders. Consumption of any amount of alcohol was associated with a 40% reduction in the risk of iron deficiency anemia.

CONCLUSIONS:

Consumption of up to 2 alcoholic drinks/day seems to be associated with reduced risk of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia without a concomitant increase in the risk of iron overload. Consumption of >2 alcoholic drinks/day is associated with a significant elevation in the risk of iron overload.

PMID:
15131790
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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