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Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2004 May;85(5):710-6.

A randomized controlled trial of weight-bearing versus non-weight-bearing exercise for improving physical ability after usual care for hip fracture.

Author information

  • 1Prince Wales Medical Research Institute, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia. c.sherrington@unsw.edu.au

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To compare the effects of weight-bearing and non-weight-bearing home exercise programs and a control program on physical ability (strength, balance, gait, functional performance) in older people who have had a hip fracture.

DESIGN:

Randomized controlled trial with 4-month follow-up.

SETTING:

Australian community-dwellers (82%) and residents of aged care facilities who had completed usual care after a fall-related hip fracture.

PARTICIPANTS:

One hundred twenty older people entered the trial, 40 per group (average age +/- standard deviation, 79+/-9y) and 90% completed the 4-month retest.

INTERVENTION:

Home exercise prescribed by a physical therapist.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Strength, balance, gait, and functional performance.

RESULTS:

At the 4-month retest, there were differences between the groups in the extent of improvement since the initial assessment for balance (F(10,196)=2.82, P<.001) and functional performance (F(6,200)=3.57, P<.001), but not for strength (F(12,190)=1.09, P=.37) or gait (F(8,200)=.39, P=.92). The weight-bearing exercise group showed the greatest improvements in measures of balance and functional performance (between-group differences of 30%-40% of initial values).

CONCLUSIONS:

A weight-bearing home exercise program can improve balance and functional ability to a greater extent than a non-weight-bearing program or no intervention among older people who have completed usual care after a fall-related hip fracture.

PMID:
15129393
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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