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Curr Opin Obstet Gynecol. 2004 Feb;16(1):87-92.

Immunological treatment of ovarian cancer.

Author information

1
Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas 72205, USA. mcannon@uams.edu

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW:

Development of immunological treatments for ovarian cancer has not been a conspicuous success story over the past few years. Only a handful of clinical trials have reported immunological responses, and correlation with clinical benefit has been elusive. Several recent studies presented in this review, however, point to a revival of optimism for the development of novel immunotherapeutic strategies.

RECENT FINDINGS:

The cloning and sequencing of CA125, coupled with novel structural and functional insights, undoubtedly represent important steps forward. The possibility that CA125 could play a role in evasion of immunity by ovarian tumors may represent a new challenge, but does not detract from its potential as a therapeutic target. Of the recent clinical trial reports, the most intriguing results were seen from immunotherapy with a conventional mouse monoclonal antibody specific for CA125, in which human anti-mouse antibody responses correlated significantly with improved survival of patients with advanced stage ovarian cancer and clinical evidence of recurrent disease at the time of treatment.

SUMMARY:

There is little doubt that CA125 will undergo a renaissance as an important target antigen for development of novel immunological treatments, particularly with regard to cellular therapies. Identification of other novel ovarian tumor antigens will also accelerate research focused on stimulation of T-cell immunity. Current research trends suggest a paradigm shift in emphasis from vaccines designed to elicit antibody responses to strategies such as dendritic cell vaccination that are designed to induce broader immunity, including ovarian tumor antigen-specific helper T-lymphocyte and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte responses.

PMID:
15128013
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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