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Ann Surg Oncol. 2004 May;11(5):542-9.

Cryoablation of early-stage breast cancer: work-in-progress report of a multi-institutional trial.

Author information

1
Department of Surgery, University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, MI, USA. msabel@umich.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

With recent improvements in breast imaging, our ability to identify small breast tumors has markedly improved, prompting significant interest in the use of ablation without surgical excision to treat early-stage breast cancer. We conducted a multi-institutional pilot safety study of cryoablation in the treatment of primary breast carcinomas.

METHODS:

Twenty-nine patients with ultrasound-visible primary invasive breast cancer </=2.0 cm were enrolled. Twenty-seven (93%) successfully underwent ultrasound-guided cryoablation with a tabletop argon gas-based cryoablation system with a double freeze/thaw cycle. Standard surgical resection was performed 1 to 4 weeks after cryoablation. Patients were monitored for complications, and pathology data were used to assess efficacy.

RESULTS:

Cryoablation was successfully performed in an office-based setting with only local anesthesia. There were no complications to the procedure or postprocedural pain requiring narcotic pain medications. Cryoablation successfully destroyed 100% of cancers <1.0 cm. For tumors between 1.0 and 1.5 cm, this success rate was achieved only in patients with invasive ductal carcinoma without a significant ductal carcinoma-in-situ (DCIS) component. For unselected tumors >1.5 cm, cryoablation was not reliable with this technique. Patients with noncalcified DCIS were the cause of most cryoablation failures.

CONCLUSIONS:

Cryoablation is a safe and well-tolerated office-based procedure for the ablation of early-stage breast cancer. At this time, cryoablation should be limited to patients with invasive ductal carcinoma </=1.5 cm and with <25% DCIS in the core biopsy. A multicenter phase II clinical trial is planned.

PMID:
15123465
DOI:
10.1245/ASO.2004.08.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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