Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Biochemistry. 2004 May 11;43(18):5532-8.

Role of the 9-methyl group of retinal in cone visual pigments.

Author information

1
Department of Ophthalmology, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina 29425, USA.

Abstract

In rhodopsin, the 9-methyl group of retinal has previously been identified as being critical in linking the ligand isomerization with the subsequent protein conformational changes that result in the activation of its G protein, transducin. Here, we report studies on the role of this methyl group in the salamander rod and cone pigments. Pigments were generated by combining proteins expressed in COS cells with 11-cis 9-demethyl retinal, where the 9-methyl group on the polyene chain has been deleted. The absorption spectra of all pigments were blue-shifted. The red cone and blue cone/green rod pigments were unstable to hydroxylamine; whereas, the rhodopsin and UV cone pigments were stable. The lack of the 9-methyl group of the chromophore did not affect the ability of the red cone and blue cone/green rod pigments to activate transducin. On the other hand, with the rhodopsin and UV cone pigments, activation was diminished. Interestingly, the red cone pigment containing the retinal analogue remained active longer than the native pigment. Thus, the 9-methyl group of retinal is not important in the activation pathway of the red cone and blue cone/green rod pigments. However, for the red cone pigment, the 9-methyl group of retinal appears to be critical in the deactivation pathway.

PMID:
15122919
DOI:
10.1021/bi036097u
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for American Chemical Society
Loading ...
Support Center