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Pediatrics. 2004 May;113(5):1204-8.

Sleep deprivation for pediatric sedated procedures: not worth the effort.

Author information

1
Department of Anesthesiology, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland 20814, USA. cshields@usuhs.mil

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Sleep deprivation is commonly used to enhance the effectiveness of pediatric sedation and to decrease sedation failures. We reviewed our sedation database to evaluate the efficacy of sleep deprivation.

METHODS:

The entire pediatric sedation unit database (n = 5640) was reviewed retrospectively. Patients without complete data sets were excluded. The remaining patients were separated into 2 groups: 3272 patients who underwent noninvasive procedures and 1210 who underwent invasive procedures. A subgroup of noninvasive procedure patients <2 years old (n = 1398) was also analyzed. The sedation failure rate (%) and nursing care hours for both sleep-deprived and non-sleep-deprived patients were analyzed.

RESULTS:

In the noninvasive procedure group, the sedation failure rate was 5.7% for the sleep-deprived patients and 5.6% for the non-sleep-deprived patients, whereas the sedation failure rate for children <2 years old was 4.2% for sleep-deprived patients and 4.7% for non-sleep-deprived patients. The sedation failure rate in the invasive procedure group was 7.5% for sleep-deprived patients and 7.2% for non-sleep-deprived patients. Nursing care hours in the noninvasive procedure group were significantly longer for the sleep-deprived patients (4.5 +/- 1.6 hours) versus the non-sleep-deprived patients (3.8 +/- 1.6 hours). This finding was true also for the subgroup of children <2 years old (sleep-deprived patients: 4.2 +/- 1.4 hours; non-sleep-deprived patients: 3.5 +/- 1.4 hours). No difference was noted in nursing care hours for the invasive procedure group.

CONCLUSIONS:

Sleep deprivation had no effect in reducing the pediatric sedation failure rate. The patients having noninvasive procedures who were sleep deprived required significantly more nursing care hours than their non-sleep-deprived counterparts. Routine use of sleep deprivation for pediatric sedation should be critically reevaluated.

PMID:
15121930
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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