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Biol Psychiatry. 2004 May 15;55(10):1001-6.

Striatal amphetamine-induced dopamine release in patients with schizotypal personality disorder studied with single photon emission computed tomography and [123I]iodobenzamide.

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1
Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University, and New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, 10032, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Previous imaging studies demonstrated that schizophrenia is associated with increased amphetamine-induced dopamine (DA) release in the striatum, most pronounced during episodes of illness exacerbation. Schizotypal personality disorder (SPD) is a schizophrenia spectrum disorder, genetically related to schizophrenia. The goal of this study was to investigate striatal DA function in patients with SPD.

METHODS:

In our study, 13 SPD patients and 13 matched healthy control subjects underwent single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) scan during bolus plus constant infusion of the D2/3 radiotracer [123I]iodobenzamide (IBZM). Striatal specific to nonspecific equilibrium partition coefficient (V(3)") was measured at baseline and following amphetamine administration (.3 mg/kg).

RESULTS:

No significant differences were observed in baseline V(3)" between groups. Amphetamine induced a larger decrease in [123I]IBZM V(3)" in SPD patients (-12 +/- 5%) compared with control subjects (-7 +/- 5%, p =.03).

CONCLUSIONS:

The reduction in [123I]IBZM V(3)" induced by amphetamine in SPD was similar to that observed in remitted schizophrenia patients (-10 +/- 9%, n = 17), but significantly lower than that observed during illness exacerbation (-24 +/- 13%, n = 17). This suggests that DA dysregulation in schizophrenia spectrum disorders might have a trait component, present in remitted patients with schizophrenia and in SPD, and a state component, associated with psychotic exacerbations but not SPD.

PMID:
15121484
DOI:
10.1016/j.biopsych.2004.01.018
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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