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J Soc Gynecol Investig. 2004 May;11(4):241-51.

Effects of epidermal growth factor/hydrocortisone on the growth and differentiation of human ovarian surface epithelium.

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1
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Ovarian surface epithelium (OSE), the precursor of the epithelial ovarian carcinomas, has limited growth potential in culture. Epidermal growth factor+hydrocortisone (EGF+HC) enhances its growth but induces epitheliomesenchymal transition (EMT). This study was undertaken to define the effects of EGF+HC and their reversibility, to optimize growth-promoting media, and to relate OSE phenotypes in vitro to physiologic states in vivo.

METHODS:

OSE was cultured in media 199/MDCB105 or EBM (Clonetics) with 2% or 10% fetal bovine serum with or without 10 ng/mL EGF, 1.0 microg/mL HC, and 1.0 microg/mL bovine brain extract. Growth rates and growth potentials (population doublings [PD] to senescence) were defined, and growth patterns and expression of keratin and collagen types III and IV were compared with the ovarian cancer cell lines OVCAR3 and SKOV3.

RESULTS:

EGF+HC increased growth potentials from 12-14 PD to 40-42 PD and reduced PD time from 53 hours to 20 hours. Without EGF+HC, OSE cells remained uniformly epithelial. EGF+HC induced EMT (mesenchymal shapes, reduced keratin, and production of collagenous extracellular matrix), but the EMT response varied greatly among OSE from different women. EMT was reversed over 1-2 weeks by subculture into EGF+HC-free medium in passage 1, but inconsistently thereafter. EGF+HC had no effect on the differentiation of ovarian carcinoma lines.

CONCLUSION:

The phenotype of intact OSE in vivo is most closely reproduced in media without EGF+HC. EGF+HC enhances growth but initiates EMT, which likely mimics a repair response. Variations in EGF+HC-induced phenotypes point to the existence of OSE subpopulations with differing responsiveness to growth factors or steroids, which may relate to their susceptibility to malignant transformation.

PMID:
15120699
DOI:
10.1016/j.jsgi.2003.10.010
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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