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Hypertension. 2004 Jun;43(6):1202-7. Epub 2004 Apr 26.

Determinants of blood pressure response to quinapril in black and white hypertensive patients: the Quinapril Titration Interval Management Evaluation trial.

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1
Department of Internal Medicine, Wayne State University, Detroit, Mich 48201, USA.

Abstract

Race has been considered an important factor in determining blood pressure response to treatment and selection of antihypertensive drug therapy. Data collected during a clinical trial that evaluated rapidity of medication up-titration with blood pressure response to monotherapy with the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor quinapril were used to characterize response in 533 black and 2046 white participants. Our objectives were to examine the influence of race and other factors on blood pressure response and to assess the degree to which nonrace factors account for apparent racial differences in response. Average systolic and diastolic blood pressure responses (baseline minus follow-up) to treatment were assessed with treatment groups combined. Crude systolic and diastolic blood pressure responses averaged 4.7 and 2.4 mm Hg less, respectively, in black compared with white participants; however, the response distributions largely overlapped. In multivariate linear regression models adjusted for study design variables and measured participant characteristics, the racial difference in systolic response was reduced by 51% to 2.3 mm Hg, and diastolic response by 21% to 1.9 mm Hg. In these models, participant characteristics, including age, gender, body size, and pretreatment blood pressure severity, significantly predicted either attenuated or enhanced blood pressure response to treatment. Our findings demonstrate that a large source of variability of blood pressure response to treatment is within, not between, racial groups, and that factors that vary at the level of the individual contribute to apparent racial differences in response to treatment.

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