Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Endocrinology. 2004 Aug;145(8):3904-12. Epub 2004 Apr 29.

Circulating triglycerides impact on orexigenic peptides and neuronal activity in hypothalamus.

Author information

1
Laboratory of Behavioral Neurobiology, Rockefeller University, New York, New York 10021, USA.

Abstract

Little is known about the impact of circulating lipids on brain processes. Building on evidence that chronic fat consumption stimulates hypothalamic peptides in close association with elevated triglycerides (TG), this study examined whether an acute rise in TG levels induced by fat emulsion can affect these hypothalamic systems. In normal weight rats, ip injection of Intralipid (20%, 5 ml) during the first 4 h after injection produced a robust increase in TG levels and nonesterified fatty acids, but had no impact on glucose, insulin, or leptin levels. This was accompanied by a marked increase in the expression of particular orexigenic peptides, galanin, orexins, and the opioid, enkephalin, which are known to be positively related to fat ingestion. This effect, similarly induced by 4 h of high fat diet consumption, was detected in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) for galanin, in the perifornical hypothalamus (PFH) for orexins, and in the PVN, PFH, as well as the arcuate nucleus (ARC) for enkephalin. It was not seen, however, for neuropeptide Y and agouti-related protein localized in the ARC, which are unaffected or reduced by dietary fat. This site specificity was confirmed by c-Fos immunostaining, a marker of neuronal activity, which was increased by Intralipid in the PVN and PFH, but not in the ARC, and was detected in 20% of orexin-expressing neurons in the PFH. These findings suggest that circulating lipids, through different mechanisms, may stimulate hypothalamic neurons, which synthesize specific feeding stimulatory peptides that possibly contribute to hyperphagia during consumption of a fat-rich diet.

PMID:
15117877
DOI:
10.1210/en.2003-1582
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Silverchair Information Systems
    Loading ...
    Support Center