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Am J Public Health. 2004 May;94(5):748-54.

Social factors and periodontitis in an older population.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, 722 W. 168th Street, New York, NY 10032, USA. lnb2@columbia.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

We assessed the prevalences of periodontitis by education and income levels among US adults with data from the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

METHODS:

The study was limited to non-Hispanic Blacks, Mexican Americans, and non-Hispanic Whites 50 years of age or older with a complete periodontal assessment during the dental examination.

RESULTS:

Blacks with higher education and income levels had a significantly higher prevalence of periodontitis than their White and Mexican-American counterparts. The relationship between income level and periodontitis was modified by race/ethnicity. High-income Blacks exhibited a higher prevalence of periodontitis than did low-income Blacks and high-income Whites.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our findings call attention to the importance of recognizing socioeconomic status-related health differences across racial/ethnic groups within the social, political, and historical context.

Republished in

PMID:
15117695
PMCID:
PMC1448332
DOI:
10.2105/ajph.94.5.748
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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